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What is Ouroboros?
Is Ouroboros the same as the Recursive InterNetwork Architecture (RINA)?
How can I use Ouroboros right now?
What are the benefits of Ouroboros?
How do you manage the namespaces?

What is Ouroboros?

Ouroboros is a packet-based IPC mechanism. It allows programs to communicate by sending messages, and provides a very simple API to do so. At its core, it's an implementation of a recursive network architecture. It can run next to, or over, common network technologies such as Ethernet and IP.

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Is Ouroboros the same as the Recursive InterNetwork Architecture (RINA)?

No. Ouroboros is a recursive network, and is born as part of our research into RINA networks. Without the pioneering work of John Day and others on RINA, Ouroboros would not exist. We consider the RINA model an elegant way to think about distributed applications and networks.

However, there are major architectural differences between Ouroboros and RINA. The most important difference is the location of the "transport functions" which are related to connection management, such as fragmentation, packet ordering and automated repeat request (ARQ). RINA places these functions in special applications called IPCPs that form layers known as Distributed IPC Facilities (DIFs) as part of a protocol called EFCP. This allows a RINA DIF to provide an IPC service to the layer on top.

Ouroboros has those functions in every application. The benefit of this approach is that it is possible to multi-home applications in different networks, and still have a reliable connection. It is also more resilient since every connection is - at least in theory - recoverable unless the application itself crashes. So, Ouroboros IPCPs form a layer that only provides IPC resources. The application does its connection management, which is implemented in the Ouroboros library. This architectural difference impact the components and protocols that underly the network, which are all different from RINA.

This change has a major impact on other components and protocols. We are preparing a research paper on Ouroboros that will contain all these details and more.

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How can I use Ouroboros right now?

At this point, Ouroboros is a useable prototype. You can use it to build small deployments for personal use. There is no global Ouroboros network yet, but if you're interested in helping us set that up, contact us on our channel or mailing list.

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What are the benefits of Ouroboros?

We get this question a lot, and there is no single simple answer to it. Its benefits are those of a RINA network. In general, if two systems provide the same service, simpler systems tend to be the more robust and reliable ones. This is why we designed Ouroboros the way we did. It has a bunch of small improvements over current networks which may not look like anything game-changing by themselves, but do add up. The reaction we usually get when demonstrating Ouroboros, is that it makes everything really really easy.

Some benefits are improved anonymity as we do not send source addresses in our data transfer packets. This also prevents all kinds of swerve and amplification attacks. The packet structures are not fixed (as the number of layers is not fixed), so there is no fast way to decode a packet when captured "raw" on the wire. It also makes Deep Packet Inspection harder to do. By attaching names to data transfer components (so there can be multiple of these to form an "address"), we can significantly reduce routing table sizes.

The API is very simple and universal, so we can run applications as close to the hardware as possible to reduce latency. Currently it requires quite some work from the application programmer to create programs that run directly over Ethernet or over UDP or over TCP. With the Ouroboros API, the application doesn't need to be changed. Even if somebody comes up with a different transmission technology, the application will never need to be modified to run over it.

Ouroboros also makes it easy to run different instances of the same application on the same server and load-balance them. In IP networks this requires at least some NAT trickery (since each application is tied to an interface:port). For instance, it takes no effort at all to run three different webserver implementations and load-balance flows between them for resiliency and seamless attack mitigation.

The architecture still needs to be evaluated at scale. Ultimately, the only way to get the numbers, are to get a large (pre-)production deployment with real users.

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How do you manage the namespaces?

Ouroboros uses names that are attached to programs and processes. The layer API always uses hashes and the network maps hashes to addresses for location. This function is similar to a DNS lookup. The current implementation uses a DHT for that function in the ipcp-normal (the ipcp-udp uses a DynDNS server, the eth-llc and eth-dix use a local database with broadcast queries).

But this leaves the question how we assign names. Currently this is ad-hoc, but eventually we will need an organized way for a global namespace so that application names are unique. If we want to avoid a central authority like ICANN, a distributed ledger would be a viable technology to implement this, similar to, for instance, namecoin.

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